Veterans Health Information Clearing House

Veterans Health Information Clearing House

Veterans Health Information Clearing House

Health Benefits

New York State Division of Veterans' Affairs
For information on possible health care treatment and benefits information and applications, contact the New York State Division of Veterans' Affairs toll-free hotline at: 1-888-VETS NYS (1-888-838-7697)
New York State Division of Veteran's Affairs - Benefits
The New York State Division of Veterans' Affairs provides a summary of state and federal benefits for veterans and their dependents.
TRICARE
This site has everything you ever wanted to know about TRICARE under one virtual roof. This Web site, which debuted November 10, 2006, combines the information that was available at www.tricare.osd.mil and www.tricareonline.com. It also serves as a portal to five user-specific content areas for information, whether someone is a TRICARE beneficiary or not.
  • Filling Prescriptions
    TRICARE offers several convenient ways to have prescriptions filled depending on a family's specific needs. You can have prescriptions filled using any of the available options, based on your specific situation, and you can use more than one option at a time.
  • TriWest Healthcare Alliance
    TriWest Healthcare Alliance, one of the TRICARE regional contractors, launched this national Web site to help National Guard and reserve service members better understand the military health benefits available through TRICARE.
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Site Navigator
A comprehensive, organized listing of Veterans Administration Web sites including sites with information on, VA health and wellness programs, determining eligibility for VA services or programs, specific medical conditions, educational benefits and more.
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
The general toll-free number for the Department of Veterans Affairs can provide you with a wide array of information. You can verify the status of disability or survivors' benefits payments. You can check on benefits for which you may be eligible including home loans, life insurance, education and health care. There is also information on establishing a direct deposit account, directions to VA regional offices and the ability to access a VA benefits counselor. Call: 1-800-827-1000.
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) On-line Applications
The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is now accepting on-line applications from veterans, survivors and other claimants filing initial applications for disability compensation, pension, education, and vocational rehabilitation and employment benefits without the additional requirement to submit a signed paper copy of the application.
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Federal Benefits for Veterans and Dependents - 2010 Edition
Veterans of the United States armed forces may be eligible for a broad range of programs and services provided by the federal Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). These benefits are legislated in Title 38 of the United States Code. This booklet contains a summary of these benefits effective Jan. 1, 2010. For additional information, visit the VA Web page at www.va.gov.

La versión en español de este folleto se encuentra disponible en formato Adobe Acrobat a través de el link: www1.va.gov/opa/feature/index.asp.
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Health Benefits Service Center
You can also find out about veterans' benefits, if you are eligible for benefits, how to apply, and what it will cost by calling the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Benefits Service Center toll-free at: 1-877-222-VETS (1-888-222-8387) or by visiting the Web site.

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Information for Afghanistan Veterans

Office of Public Health and Environmental Hazards
Hazardous Exposures: Information on chemical, radiation, physical and environmental hazards during military service, possible health-related problems and VA benefits
NYSHealth Resource Center on Returning Veterans and Their Families
The NYSHealth Resource Center on Returning Veterans and Their Families provides summary information and links to national, state, and local resources that focus on reintegration issues of returning veterans and their families. These resources include data sources, related publications, key organizations and initiatives.

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Information for Gulf War Veterans

(Including those who served in Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, and Iraqi Freedom)

Environmental Agents
This site directs readers to VA Web sites on the Gulf War, Agent Orange, Depleted Uranium, and Ionizing Radiation programs, material for Afghanistan veterans, and information about the VA War-Related Illnesses and Injury Study Centers (WRIISCs), originally known as the Centers for the Study of War-Related Illnesses.
GulfLINK Medical Information
GulfLINK Medical Information. This Department of Defense site offers information on a wide variety of medical issues and evaluation programs offered by the department and the Department of Veterans Affairs including the Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program, medical follow-up on depleted uranium exposure effects, and the Gulf War. The site also has medical publications and research reports on Gulf War-related medical issues.
Gulf War Illnesses
This site deals with the health problems and concerns of Gulf War veterans and their families. It includes the VA Gulf War Veterans Information helpline number 1-800-PGW-VETS, and lists VA Gulf War-related articles, reviews and publications, including a Gulf War Research Report to Veterans, a Questions-and-Answers brochure, journal article summaries, VA's Gulf War manual, a Gulf War fact sheet, also the Gulf War Risk Factor Report Reprints. There are links to the Gulf War Review newsletters, demonstration projects, an online independent study course for health professionals, and other information and material.
Health of Veterans & Deployed Forces - Institute of Medicine (IoM)
The Institute of Medicine (IoM) has created a Web site with information about a variety of military-related health issues. The site has four separate sections covering the last four major military conflicts (WWII, Vietnam, Korea, and the Gulf War). The site includes IoM-produced reports, information on pending reports, studies about chemical and biological agents suspected of causing health problems for military members and information about deployment health.
NYSHealth Resource Center on Returning Veterans and Their Families
The NYSHealth Resource Center on Returning Veterans and Their Families provides summary information and links to national, state, and local resources that focus on reintegration issues of returning veterans and their families. These resources include data sources, related publications, key organizations and initiatives.
U.S. Defense Department Depleted Uranium Frequently Asked Questions
The Defense Department answers frequently asked questions about depleted uranium on this page with specific reference to the Gulf War.

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Information for Vietnam Veterans

Agent Orange
This Department of Veterans Affairs site has information on the herbicide as well as links to the Agent Orange Registry, diseases associated with exposure, health benefits, Agent Orange Review newsletter and more.
Health of Veterans & Deployed Forces - Institute of Medicine (IoM)
The Institute of Medicine (IoM) has created a Web site with information about a variety of military-related health issues. The site has four separate sections covering the last four major military conflicts (WWII, Vietnam, Korea, and the Gulf War). The site includes IoM-produced reports, information on pending reports, studies about chemical and biological agents suspected of causing health problems for military members and information about deployment health.

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Information for Women Veterans

TRICARE Maternity Care Fact Sheet
TRICARE Management Activity's TRICARE Maternity Care Options Fact Sheet provides expectant mothers who are TRICARE beneficiaries with information regarding the options available for receiving health care services before, during and after childbirth. The scope of these services and their associated costs are related to beneficiary status, proximity to military treatment facility (MTF) services, and choice of TRICARE program and provider.
Women Veterans Health Program
This web site provides information on health care services available to women Veterans, including comprehensive primary care as well as specialty care such as reproductive services, rehabilitation, mental health, and treatment for military sexual trauma.

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Information on AIDS/Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C Care - Veterans Affairs
The Web site of the VA's National Hepatitis C Program provides comprehensive information for both patients and health professionals on this common viral infection of the liver.
HIV/AIDS - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
This Centers for Disease Control and Prevention site offers general information on HIV/AIDS including coinfection with other diseases, transmission, prevention and research.
HIV/AIDS - New York State Department of Health
This New York State Department of Health site offers a wide variety of information for consumers and practitioners regarding AIDS treatments, testing and programs available to assist individuals.
Viral Hepatitis - New York State Department of Health
This New York State Department of Health site offers testing, treatment and vaccination information on hepatitis A, B and C and provides links to support groups as well as a physician locater service. A list of a variety of brochures and other materials that can be ordered is also available. There is also a toll-free hepatitis hotline that can be reached at: 1-800-522-5006.
Viral Hepatitis C - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
This Centers for Disease Control and Prevention site offers basic information on hepatitis C.

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Information on Brain Injury

Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center
DVBIC's mission is to server active duty military, their beneficiaries, and veterans with traumatic brain injuries through state-of-the-art clinical care, innovative clinical research initiatives and educational programs. DVBIC includes a network of 17 centers, operating out of 10 military treatment facilities, five VA polytrauma hospitals and two civilian rehabilitation centers. The site includes brain injury information for service members and their families as well as providers.
Brainline.org
This educational web site provides authoritative information about brain injury symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. For people living with a brain injury, their families, and professionals in the field, Brainline also offers an online community of support through social networking sites. It received support from the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center.
BrainLineMilitary.org
BrainLineMilitary.org provides military-specific information and resources on traumatic brain injury to veterans, service members in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, National Guard, Reserve, and their families. Through video, webcasts, articles, personal stories, research briefs, and current news, those whose lives have been affected by TBI can learn more about brain injury symptoms and treatment, rehabilitation, and family issues associated with TBI care and recovery. The site is part of Brainline.org which is funded by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, the Primary Operational TBI Component of the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury.
PE Coach
This smartphone mobile application is for use with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment. Prolonged exposure (PE) therapy is considered an effective treatment for PTSD. The app allows patients to record their therapy sessions for playback between visits. The app also provides an explanation of exposure therapy, assignments, explanations of PTSD and its symptoms, and a convenient way to write notes about typically avoided locations, situations and events for later discussions with their therapist. The app was released by the Department of Defense and Veterans Affairs (DoD/VA). It was developed by National Center for Telehealth and Technology and the VA National Center for PTSD.

Information on Diabetes

Diabetes Surveillance in New York State
This state Health Department site on general diabetes diagnosis, care, testing and treatment includes useful diabetes record keepers and a list of publications that can be ordered.
National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse
This National Institutes of Health site is the home of the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse and includes information on treatments and complications of the disease as well as information on clinical trials.
General Information about Diabetes-Veterans' Affairs
This site includes web-based resources, brochures and patient education handouts on diabetes.

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Information for Veterans Exposed to Radiation

U.S. Defense Department Depleted Uranium Frequently Asked Questions
The Defense Department answers frequently asked questions about depleted uranium on this page with specific reference to the Gulf War.
Depleted Uranium - World Health Organization
This World Health Organization fact sheet covers a wide range of issues concerning depleted uranium, including potential health effects of being exposed to the substance, maximum radiation exposure limits, monitoring and treatment of exposed individuals, and recommendations regarding monitoring, clean up and disposal, to name a few.
Emerging Health Concerns - Depleted Uranium
Depleted uranium-related resources made available by the Defense Department's Deployment Health Clinical Center includes policies and directives, clinical guidance, forms and measures, fact sheets, education and training, research and related links.
Office of Public Health and Environmental Hazards-Veterans Affairs
Some U.S. Veterans may have been exposed to various environmental and occupational hazards during military service. This Web site provides information on what those hazardous exposures may be; how exposure may have occurred during military service; known and possible health problems associated with each type of exposure; VA health care, compensation, and other benefits for health problems associated with hazardous exposures during military service
Just the Facts - Depleted Uranium
Information on depleted uranium, posted by the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine.
ToxFAQs for Uranium
Health questions about uranium, with an environmental slant, are answered by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

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Mental Health Services

After Deployment
The Military Health System has launched a behavioral health Web portal. The Web site afterdeployment.org, is an effort to focus on post-deployment problems and meet the mental and behavioral health needs of service members. Intended outreach includes active duty service members, veterans, and their families. The site has particular advantages for Nation Guard and Reserve units, who may be distant from a Military Treatment Facility or otherwise located in areas lacking providers who are knowledgeable concerning militray-relate adjustment concerns.
Army Behavioral Health
This Web site provides resources and information regarding mental well-being for soldiers and their family members. Provided by the U.S. Army Medical Department, it is intended for interested soldiers, family members, the public, news media and Army Medical Department beneficiaries.
Courage to Care: A Health Campaign of Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, www.usuhs.mil, and the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Bethesda, Maryland, www.cstsonline.org
Courage to Care is a new, electronic health campaign for military and civilian professionals serving the military community, as well as for military men, women and families. Courage to Care consists of electronic fact sheets on timely health topics relevant to military life that provide actionable information. Courage to Care is in the public domain; designed to be or fit into your health outreach; customized with your local contact information and sent to your provider or support group network, even put on your own websites or sent to friends and family. Courage to Care content is developed by leading military health experts from Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, your nation's federal medical school.
Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Injury (DCoE) Outreach Center - Toll Free Phone and E-mail
The Outreach Center answers questions about psychological health and traumatic brain injury around the clock and every day of the year from members of all the military services (including National Guard and Reserve), veterans, families, healthcare providers, military leaders and employers. Call in your questions to the Outreach Center at 866-966-1020 toll-free or send an e-mail inquiry to resources@dcoeoutreach.org
Department of Defense/Veterans Administration Suicide Outreach
The site provides access to support hotlines, assessments and treatment options, professional resources and forums, and various multimedia tools. This site supports all members of the U.S. military – active and reserve, veterans, families, friends, and providers.
Make the Connection
Make the Connection is a public awareness campaign by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) that provides personal testimonies and resources to help Veterans discover ways to improve their lives. The Make the Connection campaign encourages Veterans and their families to "make the connection" – with information and resources, with the strength and resilience of Veterans like themselves, with other people, and with available sources of support including mental health treatments. Central to this campaign is MakeTheConnection.net, a one-stop resource where Veterans and their families and friends can privately explore information about physical and mental health symptoms, challenging life events, and mental health conditions. On this site, Veterans and their families and friends can learn about available resources and support.
Marine Corps DSTRESS Line
The Marine Corps DSTRESS Line is a 24/7, anonymous phone and chat counseling service with a 'Marine-to-Marine' approach. The call center is staffed with veteran Marines, former FMF Corpsmen, Marine Corps family members, and licensed clinicians with specific training in Marine Corps culture. The DSTRESS Line is available to all Marines, attached Sailors, and family members. It is Corps-wide and available around the globe through an international phone number or via the above Web site. The DSTRESS Line is a service of the U. S. Marine Corps.
Mental Health Self-Assessment Program
Screening for Mental Health is offering U.S. military personnel and their families a free, anonymous Web-based mental health and alcohol self-assessment program. Funded by the U.S. Department of Defense Office of Health Affairs, the program screens for a number of common problems that are often undiagnosed. Program users can do self-assessments for depression, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol abuse.
National Center for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
The National Center for PTSD (NCPTSD) works to advance the clinical care and social welfare of U.S. Veterans through research, education and training on PTSD and stress-related disorders. The site has fact sheets and videos on post traumatic stress and trauma and includes information for veterans and their families, health care providers, mental health providers and researchers.
NYSHealth Resource Center on Returning Veterans and Their Families
The NYSHealth Resource Center on Returning Veterans and Their Families provides summary information and links to national, state, and local resources that focus on reintegration issues of returning veterans and their families. These resources include data sources, related publications, key organizations and initiatives.
Operation Healthy Reunions
This National Mental Health Association site, Operation Healthy Reunions, distributes mental health-related educational materials to soldiers and their families on such topics as reuniting with your spouse and children, adjusting after war, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
PTSD Compensation and Military Service
This National Academies Press Web site enables visitors to read and/or order online the 256-page book, PTSD Compensation and Military Services. It recommends ways to fix shortcomings in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' program for evaluating and compensating veterans for service-connected PTSD and to restore confidence that the agency is compensating all veterans fairly. The report also addresses questions about how long after a traumatic event PTSD can arise and how to better manage PTSD claims related to sexual harassment or assault during military service.
Ready to Seek Psychological Health Care? Find the Right Resources
If you're looking for information about psychological health care but are unsure what resources are available or which ones are confidential, the Defense Centers for Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE) created a fact sheet of psychological health resources that answers those questions. You can use the fact sheet to identify a health care resource that will best benefit your specific needs.
Real Warriors Campaign
The Real Warriors Campaign combats the stigma associated with seeking psychological health care and treatment encourages service members to increase their awareness and use of these resources. To reach the broadest audience possible, the campaign features a variety of strategies including outreach and partnerships, print materials, media outreach, an interactive Web site and social media.
Resources for Returning Veterans and Their Families
This section of the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration's Web site provides critical information to veterans and their families on prevention, treatment and recovery support for mental and substance use disorders.
Tragedy Assistance Programs (TAPS)
This Web site details the various levels of support that the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS), a nonprofit Veterans Service Organization, provides to the surviving families of those who have died in service to the United States. Services include a 24-hour network for survivors, caseworkers to assist in problem solving, weekly Internet survivor chat, casualty officer and commander assistance, grief counseling referral and quarterly military survivor magazine.
T2Virtual PTSD Experience
The T2Virtual PTSD Experience, based in Second Life, is an interactive learning experience designed to let users explore the causes and symptoms of combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It includes a simulation demonstrating how PTSD may be acquired during a combat-related traumatic event. The experience includes simulations of PTSD symptoms, helping the visitor learn how PTSD symptoms may appear in a person's life. The site also includes information to help visitors determine whether they or a loved one is in need of care and how to access that care. Second Life is a popular virtual reality platform where users can socialize and connect. The PTSD Experience was developed by the National Center for Telehealth and Technology (AskUs@t2health.org).
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs National Caregiver Support Line - 1-855-260-3274
The Caregiver Support Line was created to recognize the significant contributions made by caregivers that allow veterans to remain home surrounded by family and friends. Open Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., licensed clinical social workers are available to answer questions, listen to concerns and directly link callers to the Caregiver Support Coordinator at their local VA Medical Centers. Each VA Medical Center has a Caregiver Support Coordinator who can locate assistance tailored to your unique situation.
U.S Department of Veterans Affairs Suicide Hotline 1-800-273-TALK (8255)
The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is operating a national suicide prevention hotline for veterans, 1-800-273-TALK (8255), to ensure that those with emotional crises have round-the-clock access to trained professionals. Mental health professionals in Canandaigua, New York, take toll-free calls from throughout the country and work closely with local VA mental health providers to help callers.

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Miscellaneous Information

DeployMed ResearchLINK
This web site, established to inform service members, researchers and health care providers, leaders, and interested others about Department of Defense (DoD)and other federally funded research on deployment-related health issues. DeployMed ResearchLINK presents information on deployment medical research conducted and supported by federal research programs within DoD, the Veterans Administration, and U.S. Health and Human Services. The site serves as a central resource of information on federally funded medical research related to deployments from the 1990-91 Gulf War forward.
DTRALink
This site from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, part of the U.S. Department of Defense, is a resource for family members of those who have been deployed, sent on remote assignments or are on extended temporary duty (TDY) by providing information on available support and policies.
Health of Veterans & Deployed Forces - Institute of Medicine
The Institute of Medicine (IoM) has created a Web site with information about a variety of military-related health issues. The site has four separate sections covering the last four major military conflicts (WWII, Vietnam, Korea, and the Gulf War). The site includes IoM-produced reports, information on pending reports, studies about chemical and biological agents suspected of causing health problems for military members and information about deployment health.
Make the Connection
Make the Connection is a public awareness campaign by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) that provides personal testimonies and resources to help Veterans discover ways to improve their lives. The Make the Connection campaign encourages Veterans and their families to "make the connection" – with information and resources, with the strength and resilience of Veterans like themselves, with other people, and with available sources of support including mental health treatments. Central to this campaign is MakeTheConnection.net, a one-stop resource where Veterans and their families and friends can privately explore information about physical and mental health symptoms, challenging life events, and mental health conditions. On this site, Veterans and their families and friends can learn about available resources and support.
MilitaryKidsConnect.org
www.MilitaryKidsConnect.org is a tool to help children of all military branches separated from family members because of deployments connect with other children in the same situation, as well as help them come up with ideas to cope with their stress. The site has materials for different age groups. It includes games, activities and message boards. Children can learn about the countries to which their loved ones are being deployed. The site was created by psychologists at the Department of Defense's National Center for Telehealth and Technology
Military OneSource 1-800-342-9647
This Web site, operated by the Pentagon, offers a wide range of assistance to military personnel and their family including help with child care, personal finances, emotional support during deployments, relocation information, or resources needed for special circumstances. The service is available by phone, online and face-to-face through private counseling sessions in the local community. Services are available 24/7/365.
  • Wounded Warrior Resource Center
    The Department of Defense's Military OneSource service has established a Wounded Warrier Resource Center telephone number and e-mail address for service members and their families, if they have concerns or other difficulties during their recovery process. Service memebers and their family members can now call (800) 342-9647 or e-mail wwrd@militaryonesource.com 24/7 to request support. Assistance provided by the resource center will not replace the specialized wounded warrior programs established by each of the military services, but it will offer another avenue of assistance for military families, health care services, and/or benefits information.
Project 112/Project SHAD: Resources and Materials
This site provides information about Project 112 (including Project SHAD). Project SHAD (Shipboard Hazard and Defense) was a seri es of tests conducted by the Department of Defense (DoD) during the 1960s to determine the effectiveness of shipboard detection of chemical and biological warfare agents, the protective measures against these agents, and the potential risk to U.S. forces posed by the agents. Project 112 involved similar tests conducted on land. The site includes information letters, a Questions-and-Answers document, several DoD fact sheets, plus information about filing a claim, including doing so online.
  • Chemical-Biological Warfare Exposure Web site - This Department of Defense Force Health Protection and Readiness Directorate Web site is designed to provide Service members, veterans, their families and the public with information about the testing of chemical and biological warfare agents from 1942 to 1975. The Web site presents sections on World War II, Project 112/SHAD (Shipboard Hazard and Defense), and the Cold War.
  • Long-Term Health Effects of Participation in Project SHAD (Shipboard Hazard and Defense)
    This National Academies Press Web site enables visitors to read and/or order online the 142-page book, Long-term Health Effects of Participation in Project SHAD. The authors find no clear evidence that specific long-term health effects are associated with participation in Project SHAD. However, because of limitations in the study response rates and the size of the study, the report's findings should not be misconstrued as clear evidence that there are no possible long-term health effects related to SHAD involvement.
Support Tolls for Military Families, Military Kids
A compilation of Web articles, Web sites, podcasts and other resources for military families and children. Topics range from preparing families for holidays apart and summer moves to advice for parents on coordinating child care and creating a family care plan. The Web section is part of the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. For the military families section: Support Tolls for Military Families, Military Kids.
U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Program
Formerly called the Disabled Soldier Support System (DS3), the name was changed to the U.S. Army Wounded Warrior Program (AW2) on November 10, 2005. The program is designed for soldiers severely wounded in the war on terror and provides information and assistance to aid soldiers and their families through the recovery process and beyond, from medical evacuation to reintegration into the workforce.
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs National Caregiver Support Line - 1-855-260-3274
The Caregiver Support Line was created to recognize the significant contributions made by caregivers that allow veterans to remain home surrounded by family and friends. Open Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., licensed clinical social workers are available to answer questions, listen to concerns and directly link callers to the Caregiver Support Coordinator at their local VA Medical Centers. Each VA Medical Center has a Caregiver Support Coordinator who can locate assistance tailored to your unique situation.
Wounded Soldier and Family Hotline 1-800-984-8523
U.S. Army leaders established the call center at Human Resources Command, Alexandria, VA, to help wounded troops and family members resolve medical issues and to ensure direct reporting of those issues to senior Army leadership. The hotline operates 24 hours a day, seven days per week, at 800-984-8523.
www.DrinkingIQ.org
Do you know your drinking IQ? Americans drink alcohol for a number of reasons including relieving stress, celebrating milestones and relaxing with family and friends. For some, this is not a problem, but many of us find that one drink often leads to one too many. If you have questions about alcohol's impact on your health, work performance and relationships with people you care about, it is time to get some answers. It's not easy to figure out if you have a problem with alcohol, but the free, anonymous online self-assessment is a good place to start.

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Mobile or SmartPhone Applications

The American Legion Claims Coach App
The American Legion Claims Coach provides U.S. military veterans and their families with step-by-step guidance to assist in the process of filing claims for government benefits from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. This app features a comprehensive directory of accredited American Legion service officers, searchables by ZIP Code. The app has a built-in organizer to help veterans and their families keep track of appointments, documents, and deadlines.
BioZen
The Department of Defense developed BioZen to help service members use the therapeutic benefits of biofeedback in and out of the clinic. BioZen shows real-time data from multiple body sensors including electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyography (EMG), galvanic skin response (GSR), electrocardiogram 9ECG or EKG), respirator rate, and skin temperature. It also displays Delta, Theta, Alpha, Beta, and Gamma brain waves and can combine the brain waves to show users their meditative and attentive cognitive states. Sensors must be purchased separately. This is designed for the Android platform.
Breathe2Relax
Breathe2Relax is a portable stress management tool which provides detailed information on the effects of stress on the body and instructions and practice exercises to help users learn the stress management skill called diaphragmatic breathing. Breathing exercises have been documented to decrease the body's 'fight-or-flight' (stress) response, and help with mood stabilization, anger control, and anxiety management. Breathe2Relax can be used as a stand-alone stress reduction tool, or can be used in tandem with clinical care directed by a healthcare worker. The app was developed by the Department of Defense's National Center for Telehealth and Technology.
LifeArmor
LifeArmor is intended to provide information, assessment, and self-management tools for common mental health problems in the military community. Users can browse information on 17 topics, including sleep, depression, relationship issues, and post-traumatic stress. Brief self-assessments help users measure and track their symptoms, and tools are available to assist with managing specific problems. The app was developed by the U. S. the Department of Defense's National Center for Telehealth and Technology.
mTBI Pocket Guide Mobile Application (For health care providers)
The Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Pocket Guide mobile application for health care providers gives instant access to a comprehensive quick-reference guide on improving care for mTBI patients. Designed to reflect current clinical standards of care, the mTBI Pocket Guide mobile application can help improve quality of care and clinical outcomes for patients. Military and civilian physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and related treatment and therapy providers can use the application to find information on assessing, treating, and managing common symptoms of mTBI patients. The mTBI Pocket Guide mobile app was designed by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury and developed at the National Center for Telehealth & Technology.
PE Coach
This smartphone mobile application is for use with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment. Prolonged exposure (PE) therapy is considered an effective treatment for PTSD. The app allows patients to record their therapy sessions for playback between visits. The app also provides an explanation of exposure therapy, assignments, explanations of PTSD and its symptoms, and a convenient way to write notes about typically avoided locations, situations and events for later discussions with their therapist. The app was released by the Department of Defense and Veterans Affairs (DoD/VA). It was developed by the Department of Defense's National Center for Telehealth and Technology and the VA National Center for PTSD.
Positive Activity Jackpot (PAJ)
Positive Activity Jackpot (PAJ) was designed to provide suggestions for positive activities can be accomplished on a daily basis. Resources such as PAJ have been found to help those with depression, self-harming behaviors, and more generally, in individuals without any mental health difficulties. PAJ includes Augmented Reality (AR) technology which allows the user to pan their local surrounding with their cell phone camera and view superimposed images of restaurants, shopping, social entertainment, and other positive activity options that are available within a user-defined distance. This app uses a professional behavioral health therapy called pleasant event scheduling, or PES, which is used to overcome depression. While the app does not require clinical training to use, it should not be used as a substitute for treatment by a therapist. This app has been developed by the the Department of Defense's National Center for Telehealth and Technology and has the Android operating system.
Provider Resilience
Military health care providers now have a mobile application – Provider Resilience – to help keep them productive and emotionally healthy even as they cope with the stresses of treating those injured by war either directly or indirectly. Health care providers treating military personnel face high demands for their time and personal resources. Provider burnout, compassion fatigue, secondary traumatic stress, and other negative issues are always a concern. Through psychoeducation and self-assessments, the Provider Resilience app gives frontline providers tools to keep themselves productive and healthy as they help service members, veterans, and their families. It is available for android and IOS operating systems.
PTSD Coach
PTSD Coach was designed for veterans and service members who have, or may have, post-traumatic stress disorder. The app provides users with education about PTSD, information about professional care, a self-assessment for PTSD, opportunities to find support, and tools that can help users manage the stresses of daily life with PTSD. Tools range from relaxation skills and positive self-talk to anger management. PTSD Coach was created by Veterans Affairs' National Center for PTSD and the Department of Defense's National Center for Telehealth and Technology.
Sesame Street for Military Families
The Sesame Street for Military Families app helps parents speak to children about deployments, homecomings, injuries, grief and self-expression. Because of the sensitive nature of the content, Sesame Street recommends parents review the app before using it with their children.
Tactical Breather
The Tactical Breather application can be used to gain control over physiological and psychological responses to stress. Through repetitive practice and training, anyone can learn to gain control of their heart rate, emotions, concentration, and other physiological and psychological responses to the body during stressful situations. The app was developed by the Department of Defense's National Center for Telehealth and Technology.
T2 Mood Tracker
T2 Mood Tracker is a mobile application that allows users to self-monitor, track and reference their emotional experience over a period of days, weeks and months using a visual analogue rating scale. Users can self-monitor emotional experiences associated with common deployment-related behavioral health issues like post-traumatic stress, brain injury, life stress, depression and anxiety. The app was developed by the Department of Defense's National Center for Telehealth and Technology.
U.S. Army MWR
The United States Army's Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command is a quality-of-life program that provides a variety of community, soldier, and family support programs, activities and services. Included in MWR are social, fitness, recreational, educational, and other programs and activities that enhance community life, foster soldier and unit readiness, promote mental and physical fitness, and generally provide a working and living environment that attracts and retains quality for U.S. Army soldiers, family members, retirees and its civilian workforce.

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