New York State Board for Professional Medical Conduct Takes Action Against 12 Physicians' Licenses

ALBANY, N.Y. (Sept. 20, 2010) - The New York State Board for Professional Medical Conduct, as part of its public health and safety mission , took recent actions involving the licenses of 12 physicians. The Board suspended the licenses of three physicians, accepted the surrender of eight physicians' licenses, and reached agreement with another physician to abstain from practicing medicine until a misconduct investigation is completed.

Muhammad Ahmad, M.D., 52, practicing internal medicine in Brooklyn, agreed to surrender his New York medical license effective May 18, 2010. On March 8, 2010, the physician's right to practice medicine was summarily suspended by the New York State Commissioner of Health. Dr. Ahmad did not contest the charge of having been convicted in the United States District Court, Southern District of New York, of a conspiracy to pay kickbacks and rebates in order to induce Medicaid patients to obtain medications.

Gangadhar Madupu, M.D., 56, a neurologist who practiced in the Rome, New York, area, surrendered his New York medical license effective May 27, 2010. The physician admitted guilt to the charges of willfully harassing, abusing or intimidation of four patients and did not contest charges of gross negligence in connection with four patients.

Ramon Ravelo, M.D., 52, an addiction psychiatrist in the Potsdam area, entered into an interim order of conditions effective June 18, 2010, precluding him from practicing medicine in any setting in New York State where the practice of medicine is based solely upon his New York State medical license. The physician is also precluded from using his license to practice in any other profession licensed by the Board of Regents, Department of Education, Department of Health, or the Department of State. These conditions remain in effect until the final disposition of investigations involving the United States Drug Enforcement Administration, New York State Department of Health (DOH) Bureau of Narcotic Enforcement, and the Village of Potsdam Police Department.

Geoffrey A. MacPherson, M.D., 68, a pediatrician practicing in the State of Washington, surrendered his New York medical license effective June 23, 2010. The physician did not contest the charge of having been disciplined by the Washington Department of Health for sexual misconduct and unprofessional misconduct.

Roman Sorin, M.D., 60, specializing in physical medicine and rehabilitation and general surgery in Brooklyn, had his medical license limited to preclude ordering, performing, reading or interpreting electro-neurodiagnostic studies. The physician asserted that he could not successfully defend against at least one of the acts of misconduct alleged, which included negligence on more than one occasion, fraudulent practice, ordering unwarranted tests and treatment, filing a false report, and failure to maintain accurate medical records. Dr. Sorin agreed to surrender his New York medical license effective September 30, 2010.

Paul E. Nathan, M.D., 50, a cardiologist in New Orleans, Louisiana, did not contest the charge of having been disciplined by the Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners for chemical dependency and abuse. Dr. Nathan surrendered his New York medical license effective June 28, 2010.

Mark E. Griffing, M.D., 57, a family practitioner in the Utica area, admitted that he failed to comply with a previous order of the Board for Professional Medical Conduct and that he had been convicted of Driving While Intoxicated. Effective July 9, 2010, Dr. Griffing's medical license is indefinitely suspended until a committee of the Board determines that he is both fit and competent to practice medicine safely.

Sofia A. Bentsianov, M.D., 68, who practiced internal medicine in Brooklyn, agreed she could not defend against acts of alleged misconduct, including charges of gross negligence, negligence on more than one occasion, fraudulent practice, filing a false report, ordering excessive tests and treatment, failure to maintain accurate patient records, and conduct in the practice of medicine that is evidence of moral unfitness to practice. Dr. Bentsianov surrendered her New York medical license effective July 9, 2010, and agreed to pay a $30,000 fine.

Fredric Feit, M.D., 61, who practiced physical medicine and rehabilitative medicine in New Jersey, did not contest the charge of having been convicted in Superior Court of New Jersey of theft by deception in the third degree. Dr. Feit was disciplined by the New Jersey State Medical Board and received a penalty of having his license suspended for five years, with the first two years as an active suspension and the remaining three to be stayed and to be served as probation. He also agreed to pay $11,689 costs of probation. Dr. Feit surrendered his New York medical license effective July 12, 2010.

Edward Hyung Koo Rhew, M.D., 50, an anesthesiologist formerly practicing in the New York City, area did not contest the charge of violating a condition of his previous Order of the Board for Professional Medical Conduct by failing to remain drug free. Dr. Rhew's medical license is indefinitely suspended retroactive to December 1, 2009. Upon compliance with all the conditions of the Board's Order, Dr. Rhew may petition the Board for a Modification Order staying the suspension of his medical license. The suspension of Dr. Rhew's medical license shall be terminated only by a committee of the Board based on the determination that he is fit and clinically competent to practice as a physician.

Ira H. Weiner, D.O., 60, a Pennsylvania family practitioner, was issued a Commissioner's Order and Notice of Hearing which summarily suspended Dr. Weiner's right to practice medicine in the State of New York effective July 20, 2010. Dr. Weiner was convicted of committing an act constituting a felony under federal law in the United States District Court, Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Dr. Weiner was found guilty of naturalization fraud and conspiracy to commit naturalization fraud and was sentenced to federal imprisonment for 36 months to be followed by supervised release for a term of two years and ordered to pay a $10,000 fine. The Pennsylvania State Board of Osteopathic Medicine suspended Dr. Weiner's medical license for 30 months to be followed by 18 months suspension, stayed with probation.

Stanley N. Furman, M.D., 55 practicing geriatric medicine in the Richmond, Virginia area, surrendered his New York medical license effective July 20, 2010. Dr. Furman did not contest the specification that he had been found guilty of improper professional practice and indefinitely suspended by the Virginia Board of Medicine for engaging in sexual contact with a patient.

DOH's Office of Professional Medical Conduct and the Board for Professional Medical Conduct are committed to protecting the public by investigating professional discipline issues involving physicians, physician assistants and specialist assistants.

The Office of Professional Medical Conduct is responsible for investigating all complaints of misconduct, coordinating disciplinary hearings that may result from an investigation, monitoring physicians whose licenses have been restored after temporary license surrender, and monitoring physicians, physician assistants, and specialist assistants placed on probation as a result of disciplinary action.

Information about disciplinary actions taken against physicians licensed in New York State is available on DOH's Web site at http://www.health.ny.gov/professionals/doctors/conduct/