About Local Early Intervention (EI) Program Performance Data

The federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires states to develop a six-year State Performance Plan (SPP) (PDF, 930KB, 105pg) that includes targets and improvement strategies for various areas of performance.

Each year, New York reports on the State's progress in meeting the targets for 14 performance indicators set in the SPP. This report is called the Annual Performance Report (APR). The APR is reported to the public and the U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education Programs. The following APRs are available:

In addition to reporting State performance, the performance of each local program must be reported to the public for many of the same indicators beginning in 2007 and each year thereafter.

These indicators are important because they measure the quality of performance, including how and when families receive services. They help to ensure that services are provided in accordance with federal and state law and regulations.

Local program reporting is used both for quality improvement purposes and to determine compliance with federal and state requirements. For each municipality listed and for each indicator, information on local performance, state performance, and the state or federal target is reported. Included with each indicator is a description of how it is measured and why it is important.

Data for each indicator are for the reporting period July 2008 through June 2009.

Indicators

Timely Services

Percentage of infants and toddlers with Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSPs) who receive the early intervention services on their IFSPs in a timely manner

"Timely" is defined as being delivered within 30 days of the date the parent provides consent for the IFSP services. Sometimes family circumstances or events result in delays of services. Data to discount children with services that were delayed due to family reasons were not available in New York.

Tracking these data is important because the rate of learning and development is the most rapid in a child's first three years of life. Therefore, it is important not only to identify infants and toddlers in need of intervention early but also to initiate services as soon as possible.

The source of data for this indicator is the KIDS data system. Data for all 58 local programs are included.

Services in Natural Environments

Percentage of infants and toddlers with IFSPs who primarily receive early intervention services in the home or community-based settings

Early intervention services and supports should be provided in settings where children typically live, learn, and play with activities that address children's needs built into the child's and family's typical routines, such as mealtime, bath time, or play time.

The source of data for this indicator is the KIDS data system. Data for all 58 local programs are included.

Family Outcomes

Percentage of families who report that Early Intervention Services have helped the family

  1. Know their rights
  2. Effectively communicate the children's needs
  3. Help their children develop and learn

This is the percent of families indicating that they had positive outcomes as a result of their participation in the Early Intervention Program.

The source of this data is a survey administered by New York State Department of Health, Binghamton University, and the University of Buffalo. For the FFY 2005 period, family outcomes data were collected for New York City only. For the FFY 2006 period, family outcomes data were collected for Allegany, Chenango, Delaware, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer, Lewis, Madison, Montgomery, Nassau, Orleans, Otsego, Schoharie, Schuyler, Seneca, Suffolk, Tioga, Washington, Wyoming, and Yates counties. For the FFY 2007 period, family outcomes data were collected for Cattaraugus, Cayuga, Chautauqua, Chemung, Clinton, Columbia, Cortland, Essex, Franklin, Genesee, Greene, Jefferson, Livingston, Ontario, Oswego, Putnam, Schoharie, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben, Sullivan, Tompkins, Warren, Washington, Wayne, Wyoming counties, and New York City. For the FFY 2008 period, family outcomes data were collected for Albany, Broome, Dutchess, Erie, Monroe, Niagara, Oneida, Onondaga, Orange, Rensselaer, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Ulster, and Westchester counties.

Percent Enrolled Birth to One

Percentage of children ages birth to one year who receive services in the Early Intervention Program

This is the number of children served in the Early Intervention Program compared to all children ages birth to one in the municipality.

The source of data for this indicator is the KIDS data system and census data. Data for all 58 local programs are included.

Percent Enrolled Birth to Three

Percentage of children ages birth to three years who receive services in the Early Intervention Program

This is the number of children served in the Early Intervention Program compared to all children ages birth to three in the municipality.

The source of data for this indicator is the KIDS data system and census data. Data for all 58 local programs are included.

Timely IFSP Meetings

Percentage of eligible infants and toddlers with IFSPs for whom an evaluation and an initial IFSP meeting were conducted within 45-days from the date of the referral to the Early Intervention Program

Children referred to the Early Intervention Program must be evaluated to determine eligibility and have a family service plan that meets the needs of the child and family developed within 45 days.

If family circumstances, extreme weather, or other events outside the control of the public agency result in a delay of the evaluation and/or service plan, these children are excluded from the percentage.

The source of data for this indicator is the KIDS data system. Data for all 58 local programs are included.

Transition Plans and Timelines

Percentage of children exiting the Early Intervention Program who received timely transition planning to support the child's transition to preschool or appropriate community services including

  1. Percent of IFSPs with transition steps and services to help parents understand steps that need to be taken before their child leaves the Early Intervention Program.
  2. Percent of children exiting with notification to the local school district, if the child is potentially eligible for services through the local school district's special education program. (In New York State, a parent may decline this notification; however, due to the lack of an OSEP-recognized "opt-out" policy, these children cannot be excluded from the rate. New York State anticipates having a recognized opt-out policy for the FFY 2010 reporting period, and will be allowed to exclude these children from the rate at that point.)
  3. Percent of children exiting the Early Intervention Program who were potentially eligible for Preschool Special Education Services from the local school district who had a transition conference. (In New York State, a parent may decline this conference; these children are excluded from the percentage.)

As children approach their third birthday, the Early Intervention Program helps families prepare for other age-appropriate services and supports.

The source of data for this indicator is an onsite review of a representative sample of children's records for a sample of municipalities. Data from a similar record review for each municipality will be published for this indicator in a five-year cycle. Only three municipalities had data collected in FFY 2005: Nassau, New York City, and Suffolk counties. For the FFY 2006 period, transition data were collected for Allegany, Chenango, Delaware, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer, Lewis, Madison, Montgomery, Orleans, Otsego, Schoharie, Schuyler, Seneca, Tioga, Washington, Wyoming, and Yates counties. For the FFY 2007 period, transition data were collected for Allegany, Cattaraugus, Cayuga, Chautauqua, Chemung, Chenango, Clinton, Columbia, Cortland, Delaware, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Genesee, Greene, Hamilton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Livingston, Madison, Montgomery, Nassau, Ontario, Orleans, Oswego, Otsego, Putnam, Schoharie, Schuyler, Seneca, St. Lawrence, Steuben, Suffolk, Sullivan, Tioga, Tompkins, Warren, Washington, Wayne, Wyoming, Yates counties and New York City. For the FFY 2008 period, transition data were collected for Albany, Broome, Dutchess, Erie, Monroe, Nassau, Niagara, Oneida, Onondaga, Orange, Rensselaer, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Suffolk, Ulster, Westchester counties and New York City.