Health Benefits of Quitting

HUD Public Housing is Going Smoke Free on July 31, 2018!

If you smoke and live in HUD public housing, now is a great time to quit! Your health care provider can help you quit for good with counseling and medication, and Medicaid covers it! Talk to your provider about which treatment may be right for you. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) public housing is going smoke free to protect people from harmful secondhand cigarette smoke that drifts between apartments and into offices and common areas.

Visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to learn more about the smoke-free rule and order materials.

It is never too late to quit. When you quit smoking, your health improves.

After:

  • 20 minutes, your heart rate drops.
  • 12 hours, the carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.
  • 2 weeks to 3 months, your heart attack risk begins to drop and your lung function improves.
  • 1 to 9 months, your coughing and shortness of breath decrease.
  • 1 year, your added risk of heart disease is half that of a smoker's.
  • 2-5 years, your risk of stroke is the same as nonsmokers.
  • 10 years, your lung cancer death rate is about half that of a smoker's.
  • 15 years, your risk of heart disease is back to that of a nonsmoker's.1

If you have diabetes, after you quit smoking you will have better control over your blood sugar levels.2

If you quit before getting pregnant or during your first trimester, the risk of having a low birth weight baby drops to normal.2

Quitting on your own can be hard. Help from your health care provider can help you quit for good.

References:

  1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.
  2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: What It Means to You. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2004.