Smoking and Disease

HUD Public Housing is Going Smoke Free on July 30, 2018!

If you smoke and live in HUD public housing, now is a great time to quit! Your health care provider can help you quit for good with counseling and medication, and Medicaid covers it! Talk to your provider about which treatment may be right for you. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) public housing is going smoke free to protect people from harmful secondhand cigarette smoke that drifts between apartments and into offices and common areas.

Smoking is the number one cause of preventable disease, disability and death in NYS and the United States.1 Smoking causes nearly one in five deaths in the U.S.2 Smoking kills more adults every year than illegal drug use, alcohol use, motor vehicle crashes, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and firearms combined.1

Smoking kills about 28,000 adults in NYS every year.1 And, about 750,000 adult New Yorkers live with serious smoking-related illness.3 Yet, about two million NYS adults still smoke because most are addicted to the nicotine in tobacco.1,2

Smoking causes many diseases, including four of the top causes of death in the U.S.:

  • Heart disease
  • Cancer almost anywhere in the body (including in the lung, colon, rectum, blood, liver, bladder, pancreas, uterus, blood, and head and neck)
  • Chronic lower respiratory disease, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema
  • Stroke3,5

Smoking is also a cause of:

  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Weak bones
  • Gum disease and tooth loss3

Smoking, Reproductive Health and Pregnancy

Smoking hurts reproductive health:

  • Women who smoke may have a harder time becoming pregnant.
  • In men, smoking can damage sperm and can cause erectile dysfunction (ED).
  • Smoking may cause miscarriage and is a cause of ectopic pregnancy (when the egg attaches to an organ other than the womb), which usually results in miscarriage.3

Smoking during pregnancy causes over 1,000 infant deaths in the U.S. each year.3 Smoking during pregnancy can cause:

  • damage to developing fetal lungs and brain;
  • the baby to be born too early or with low birth weight, which increases the risk for serious health problems or death;
  • birth defects including cleft lip and/or cleft palate; and
  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).3

Secondhand Smoke Exposure

Secondhand smoke exposure causes about 41,000 deaths among nonsmoking adults and 400 deaths in infants in the U.S. every year.3

Some of the illnesses and diseases secondhand smoke exposure can cause include:

  • In children: ear infections, breathing problems and more frequent and severe asthma attacks2
  • In adults: heart disease, stroke and lung cancer3
  • In household pets: cancer of the nose, lungs and immune system, heart problems, pneumonia, allergies and fertility problems6

The addictive nicotine in tobacco can make it hard to quit. But, it's never too late to quit, and your health care provider can help you quit for good.

References:

  1. New York State Department of Health. BRFSS Brief, No. 1802. Cigarette Smoking – New York State Adults, 2016.
  2. National Institute on Drug Abuse.Tobacco, Nicotine and E-Cigarettes. National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2018.
  3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.
  4. Estimated smoking-attributable morbidity in NYS calculated from estimated smoking-attributable morbidity in the U.S. sourced from The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014, and the annual smoking-attributable deaths in NYS statistic sourced from Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs — 2014. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health and Health, 2014.
  5. National Center for Health Statistics. Health, United States, 2016: With Chartbook on Long-term Trends in Health. Table 19. Hyattsville, MD. 2017.
  6. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Be Smoke-free and Help Your Pets Live Longer, Healthier Lives. Page Last Updated: 10/19/2017.