Learn More about Different Types of Environmental Facilities

This project was initiated to map the following specific types of environmental facilities.

Water Discharge Sites

Wastewater discharges and storm water run-off in New York State are regulated by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) under the State Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (SPDES). Under this system, a SPDES permit is required by municipal, industrial, private, commercial, and institutional facilities to discharge wastewater or storm water run-off to surface and/or ground waters in New York State. Storm water discharges, to which no pollutants have been added, are exempt from SPDES permit requirements. Discharges to ground water of sewage wastes, to which no industrial or other wastes have been added, at flow rates below 1,000 gallons per day, are also exempt from SPDES permit requirements. This database contains information about facilities that have been issued SPDES permits in New York State.

Petroleum Bulk Storage

Under the New York State "Control of the Bulk Storage of Petroleum" Law, owners of petroleum storage facilities in New York State, with a total storage capacity of more than 1,100 gallons, are required to register their storage facilities with New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). Both underground and aboveground storage tanks are regulated. In addition, all such facilities must meet handling and storage requirements established by NYSDEC. This dataset contains the names and locations of PBS Facilities in New York State.

NYSDEC does not maintain the records for Cortland, Nassau, Rockland, Suffolk, and Westchester Counties. These records are maintained by their respective counties and are not included in this dataset or on the map.

Title V and State Air Facility

Emissions of air pollutants from stationary sources in New York State are regulated by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). The types and quantities of pollutants a facility emits determines the type of permit required for that facility. Facilities with air emissions greater than certain thresholds are classified as Major Facilities and require a Title V permit. A facility that is large enough to exceed emission thresholds, but does not, is issued a State Facility (SF) Permit, provided its emissions are greater than 50 percent of emission threshold levels. Emission thresholds can be found on the NYSDEC website on the Air Pollution Control Permit Program page. This dataset contains the names and locations of Title V and SF permitted facilities in New York State.

Hazardous Waste Management Facilities

Hazardous waste management facilities are permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. These facilities may receive hazardous wastes from other facilities or may be limited to the treatment, storage, or disposal of hazardous wastes generated at their own facility. These facilities are regulated by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and are subject to the permitting requirements of State regulations. This dataset contains the names and locations of sites of hazardous waste management facilities in New York State.

Active Solid Waste Sites

Solid waste is collected from points of generation and transported to facilities for proper management. These include facilities such as transfer stations, construction and demolition debris processing facilities, composting facilities, municipal waste combustion facilities, landfills and others, in which solid waste may be stored, consolidated, processed, transferred or disposed. These facilities are regulated by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Some facilities are subject to the permitting requirements of State regulations while others, which pose minimal risk to the environment, are subject to the less stringent registration provisions. This dataset contains the names and locations of solid waste management facilities in New York State.

Large Quantity Hazardous Waste Generators

Large quantity hazardous waste generators produce hazardous waste quantities in excess of 1,000 kilograms in any single calendar month and/or generate acute hazardous waste (as defined by the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) quantities in excess of 1 kilogram in any single calendar month. A waste is classified as hazardous if it is listed in Part 371 of the New York State Codes, Rules and Regulations, or if it exhibits one or more of the following four characteristics: ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity and toxicity. Additional information about identifying hazardous waste can be found on the NYSDEC website on the Regulations and Enforcement page. Large quantity hazardous waste generators are regulated by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. This dataset contains the names and locations of sites of large quantity hazardous waste generators in New York State.

Brownfields

Brownfields are abandoned or underused properties, including industrial and commercial facilities, where redevelopment or expansion may be complicated by possible environmental contamination. Contaminants include hazardous waste and/or petroleum. The Brownfield Program (BP) replaced the Voluntary Cleanup Program and is intended to enhance private-sector cleanups of brownfields and reduce development pressure on undeveloped areas. Participation in the BP is voluntary. Parties interested in participating in the BP make a commitment to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) to undertake certain cleanup activities under NYSDEC oversight, and in accordance with a plan approved by NYSDEC. When the participants complete the cleanup, a release from liability, with some reservations, is provided by NYSDEC. This dataset contains the names and locations of sites in the New York State Brownfields Program.

State Superfund Program

The Inactive Hazardous Waste Disposal Site (IHWDS) Program is the State's program for identifying, investigating, and cleaning up sites where consequential amounts of hazardous waste may exist. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation is made aware of potential hazardous waste sites in a variety of ways, including notification by the responsible party and citizen complaints. These sites go through a process of investigation, evaluation, cleanup and monitoring. When the parties responsible for the contamination are known, they often pay for and perform the investigation and evaluation of cleanup options. At sites where responsible parties cannot be found or are unable or unwilling to fund an investigation, the State pays for the investigation using money from the 1986 Environmental Quality Bond Act, also known as the "State Superfund". The State may try to recover costs from a responsible party after the investigation and cleanup are complete. This dataset contains the names and locations of Inactive Hazardous Waste Sites that have been identified in New York State.

Vehicle Dismantling Facilities

Vehicle dismantling facilities dismantle end-of-life vehicles for parts and/or resell end-of-life vehicles for scrap. Vehicle dismantlers often generate wastes such as used automotive fluids, spent refrigerant, mercury switches, lead-acid batteries, or air bags. Annual reporting and self-certification are required for all dismantlers who handle more than 25 automobiles a year or who store 50 or more automobiles a year. This dataset contains the names and locations of Vehicle Dismantling Facilities in New York State.

Commercial Pesticide Sellers

Commercial pesticide permit holders are businesses that sell restricted use pesticides. Restricted use pesticides are not available for use by the general public and can only be applied by certified pesticide applicators. This dataset contains a list of commercial pesticide sellers in New York State.

Chemical Bulk Storage

Under the New York State Hazardous Substances Bulk Storage Act, owners of facilities in New York State that store hazardous materials in aboveground tanks with capacities greater than 185 gallons, or that store any amount of hazardous material below ground, are required to register the tanks with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). In addition, such facilities must comply with standards and practices which are approved for chemical bulk storage by NYSDEC. This dataset contains the names and locations of Chemical Bulk Storage Facilities in New York State.

Environmental Restoration Program

The New York State Brownfield Program is intended to accelerate the remediation and revitalization of contaminated properties, known as brownfields (see Brownfield Program description). Contaminants include hazardous waste and/or petroleum. Under the Environmental Restoration Program, the State provides grants to municipalities to reimburse up to 90 percent of on-site eligible costs and 100 percent of off-site eligible costs for site investigation and cleanup activities. After cleanup, the property may be reused for commercial, industrial, residential or public use. This dataset contains the names and locations of sites in the New York State Environmental Restoration Program.

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action Sites

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action sites are facilities that currently treat, store or dispose of hazardous wastes or have done so in the past and have the potential to release pollutants into soil, groundwater, surface water, and air. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action Program works with responsible facilities to investigate and clean up hazardous releases to protect human health and the environment. This dataset contains the names and locations of RCRA Corrective Action Sites in New York State.

Voluntary Cleanup Program (VCP)

The New York State Voluntary Cleanup Program (VCP) was designed to promote voluntary cleanup of contaminated sites including inactive hazardous waste sites, hazardous substance sites, petroleum contaminated sites and solid waste disposal sites. This program was a cooperative approach among the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), lenders, developers, and prospective purchasers of such sites. Under the VCP, a volunteer performed cleanup activities following a plan approved by NYSDEC. When the volunteer completed work, a release from liability, with some reservations, is provided by NYSDEC. The Voluntary Cleanup Program has been replaced by the Brownfield Program. This dataset contains the names and locations of sites in the New York State Voluntary Cleanup Program.

Major Oil Storage Facilities (MOSF)

Under the New York State Oil Spill Prevention, Control and Compensation Act, all oil terminals and transport vessels operating in the waters of New York State, which have a storage capacity of 400,000 gallons or more are regulated. Terminals and vessels with a capacity of 400,000 gallons or more are referred to as major oil storage facilities (MOSFs). All MOSFs are required to obtain an operating license from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and must also have a Spill Prevention, Containment and Countermeasure Plan. This plan includes management practices to prevent environmental damage resulting from oil spills. This dataset contains the names and locations of Major Oil Storage Facilities in New York State.