Cigarette Smoking and Other Tobacco Use

HUD Public Housing is Going Smoke Free on July 30, 2018!

If you smoke and live in HUD public housing, now is a great time to quit! Your health care provider can help you quit for good with counseling and medication, and Medicaid covers it! Talk to your provider about which treatment may be right for you. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) public housing is going smoke free to protect people from harmful secondhand cigarette smoke that drifts between apartments and into offices and common areas.

Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States.4 About 1 of every 5 deaths in the U.S. is caused by smoking.4 Smoking kills more people every year than alcohol use, illegal drug use, motor vehicle crashes, firearm-related incidents and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) combined.5

Tobacco Use in NYS

Efforts by the New York State Tobacco Control Program, communities, health systems, organizations and stakeholders, and state and local legislation have led to record low smoking rates among adults and youths.

However:

  • Over 2.2 million adults still smoke.6
  • Adults with poor mental health, less than a high school education or annual incomes of less than $25,000 smoke at much higher rates than the general adult population.6
  • About 35,000 high school students smoke.7 The average age they smoked a whole cigarette for the first time was at 13 years old.7
  • E-cigarette use by youth doubled between 2014 and 2016.8
  • E-cigarettes are now the most commonly used tobacco product by youth – more than cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco and hookah.8

Smoking Causes Death and Disease

  • Smoking kills about 28,000 adult New Yorkers every year.6
  • About 750,000 adults in NYS live with serious smoking-related illness.5
  • Smoking impairs fertility in women and men and causes certain birth defects.9
  • Smoking causes many diseases, including:10

Quitting Benefits You and Everyone Around You11

  • Within 20 minutes, your blood pressure and heart rate drop.
  • Within 12 hours, the carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.
  • After just 1 year, your risk for a heart attack drops sharply.
  • Over time, you:
    • lower your risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer and respiratory illness, and
    • strengthen your muscles, bones and immune system.
  • You protect your family, friends and people around you from secondhand smoke exposure.

Exposure to Secondhand Smoke is Harmful and Deadly12

  • There is no safe level of exposure to cigarette smoke.
  • Secondhand smoke exposure causes more than 41,000 deaths among nonsmoking adults and 400 infant deaths in the U.S. every year.
  • Children exposed to secondhand smoke:
    • Have more frequent and severe asthma attacks;
    • Are more likely to get ear infections; and
    • Have more breathing problems such as bronchitis and pneumonia.

Tobacco Use Costs Lives and Money

  • In addition to the human costs, every year smoking costs NYS:
    • $10.4 billion in health care, of which more than a third ($3.3 billion) is paid for by Medicaid.13,14
    • Billions of dollars more in lost workplace productivity.4
  • Reducing tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke saves lives and money. In the first year of the expanded Clean Indoor Air Act, hospital admissions for heart attacks decreased and saved about $56 million in health care costs.15

For More Information on the Harmful Effects of Smoking and Tobacco Use

For Help Quitting Smoking and Tobacco Use

  1. Babb S, Malarcher A, Schauer G, Asman K, Jamal A. Quitting Smoking Among Adults — United States, 2000–2015. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2017;65:1457–1464.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. Chronic Disease Indicators (CDI) Data. 2016
  3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Public Health Service. Clinical Practice Guideline – Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: 2008 Update. Content last reviewed June 2015.
  4. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.
  5. Estimated smoking-attributable morbidity in NYS calculated from estimated smoking-attributable morbidity in the U.S. sourced from The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014, and the annual smoking-attributable deaths in NYS statistic sourced from Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs — 2014. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health and Health, 2014.
  6. New York State Department of Health. BRFSS Brief, No. 1704. Cigarette Smoking – New York State Adults, 2015.
  7. New York State Department of Health. Health Data NY. Youth Tobacco Survey: Beginning 2000. Updated May 18, 2017.
  8. New York State Department of Health. Youth Cigarette Use at All-Time Low, ENDS Use Doubles. StatShot Vol. 10, No. 1, March 2017.
  9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tips From Former Smokers® - Smoking, Pregnancy and Babies. Page last reviewed and updated January 23, 2017.
  10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Smoking and Tobacco Use. Health Effects of Cigarettes Smoking. Page last reviewed and updated May 15, 2017.
  11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Smoking and Tobacco Use. Benefits of Quitting. Page last updated June 30, 2017.
  12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Smoking and Tobacco Use. Secondhand (SHS) Facts. Page last reviewed and updated February 21, 2017.
  13. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. New York State Highlights, 2009.
  14. Armour, B. S., Finkelstein, E. A., & Fiebelkorn, I. C. (2009). State-Level Medicaid Expenditures Attributable to Smoking. Preventing Chronic Disease, 6(3), A84.
  15. New York State Department of Health. Hospital Admissions for Acute Myocardial Infarction in New York State Decline after Implementation of Comprehensive Smoking Law. StatShot Vol. 6, No. 9, July 2013.