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Injury and Violence in New York State

Data surveillance is a fundamental tool in injury prevention. Data surveillance systems are used to identify at-risk populations, predict patterns, and recognize risk factors.

The most recent data available shows that injuries are the leading cause of death for New Yorkers ages 1 through 34 years and are among the top causes of death for all other age groups. Over 7,000 New Yorkers die every year as a result of injury. Additionally, injuries are consistently among the leading causes of hospitalization for all age groups. Nearly 160,000 individuals are injured severely enough to require hospitalization annually. Another 1.5 million injured New Yorkers are treated and released from an emergency department each year.

Overview of New York State Injury Statistics

The two main injury data surveillance systems used in New York State are the Vital Statistics Death Files and the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS). Through the Vital Statistics Death Files, the Injury Prevention Program can track all deaths due to injury. SPARCS can be used to track all hospitalizations and emergency department visits due to injury. Both of these surveillance systems include data variables used to describe patient demographics and the underlying causes and outcomes of the injury.

In addition, the Injury Prevention Program houses the New York State Crash Outcome Data Evaluation System (see our Motor Vehicle Traffic Crash Statistics webpage). The Crash Outcome Data Evaluation System is a database that matches individual records from the Department of Motor Vehicles Accident Information System to the Department of Health Emergency Medical Services (Pre-Hospital Care Reports) and Hospital Discharge databases.

Injury Prevention Statistics for New York State

  • Injury Related Deaths

    The rate of injury related deaths in New York State has remained fairly consistent, with a high of 40.3 deaths per 100,000 New Yorkers in 1995 and a low of 33.8 deaths per 100,000 New Yorkers in 1998 and 2000. In 2008, there were 38.5 injury deaths per 100,000.

    • Unintentional injury death rates increased from 20.8 per 100,000 residents in 2000 to 25.6 in 2008.
    • Homicide rates decreased from 5.2 per 100,000 residents in 2000 to 4.4 in 2008.
    • Suicide rates have remained fairly consistent, with a slight increase from 6.7 per 100,000 residents in 2000 to 7.1 in 2008.
    • Motor vehicle related injury death rates decreased from 7.7 per 100,000 residents in 2000 to 6.2 in 2008.
      • Motor vehicle related injury deaths rates to occupants decreased from 2.8 per 100,000 residents in 2000 to 1.9 in 2008.
      • Motorcyclist injury death rates increased from 0.6 per 100,000 residents in 2000 to 0.9 in 2008.
      • Motor vehicle related injury deaths to pedestrians decreased from 1.8 per 100,000 residents in 2000 to 1.4 in 2008.
      • Motor vehicle related injury deaths to bicyclists remained at 0.1 per 100,000 residents in 2000 and 2008.
  • Injury Related Hospitalizations

    The rate of hospitalizations due to injury has also remained fairly consistent, with a high of 823.1 hospitalizations per 100,000 New Yorkers in 2007 and a low of 684.0 hospitalizations per 100,000 in 1999. There were 819.8 hospitalizations per 100,000 New Yorkers in 2008.

    • Unintentional injury hospitalization rates increased from 610.7 per 100,000 residents in 2000 to 693.7 in 2008.
    • Assault hospitalization rates increased from 46.6 per 100,000 residents in 2000 to 48.5 in 2008.
    • Self Inflicted hospitalization rates increased from 43.0 per 100,000 residents in 2000 to 52.1 in 2008.
    • Motor vehicle related injury hospitalization decreased from 85.1 per 100,000 residents in 2000 to 68.8 in 2008.
      • Motor vehicle related injury hospitalization rates to occupants decreased from 51.6 per 100,000 residents in 2000 to 39.2 in 2008.
      • Motorcyclist injury hospitalization rates increased from 6.5 per 100,000 residents in 2000 to 7.9 in 2008.
      • Motor vehicle related injury deaths to pedestrians decreased from 19.5 per 100,000 residents in 2000 to 15.3 in 2008.
      • Motor vehicle related injury to bicyclists did not change from 2000 to 2008 (3.3 per 100,000 residents).
  • Injury Related Emergency Department Visits

    Emergency Department data has only been collected since 2005. The rates of emergency department visits due to injury per 100,000 New York residents increased from 7,396.1 in 2005 to 7,733.7 in 2008.

    • Unintentional injury emergency department visit rates increased from 6,874.0 per 100,000 residents in 2005 to 7,182.7 in 2008.
    • Assault emergency department visit rates increased from 428.4 per 100,000 residents in 2005 to 445.8 in 2008.
    • Self Inflicted emergency department visit rates increased from 46.7 per 100,000 residents in 2005 to 49.1 in 2008.
    • Motor vehicle related injury emergency department visit rates decreased from 778.7 per 100,000 residents in 2005 to 685.8 in 2008.
      • Motor vehicle related injury emergency department visit rates to occupants decreased from 51.6 per 100,000 residents in 2005 to 542.3 in 2008.
      • Motorcyclist injury emergency department rates increased slightly from 21.8 per 100,000 residents in 2005 to 22.4 in 2008.
      • Motor vehicle related injury deaths to pedestrians decreased from 62.3 per 100,000 residents in 2005 to 59.9 in 2008.
      • Motor vehicle related injury to bicyclists remained fairly consistent from 2005 to 2008 (16.8 and 16.5 per 100,000 residents, respectively).

Contact Information

Center for Environmental Health
Bureau of Occupational Health and Injury Prevention
Empire State Plaza-Corning Tower, Room 1325
Albany, New York 12237
(518) 402-7900

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